Five of the Best Sustainable Packaging Resources

Enjoy this blog post from the SSC archives:

There is a TON of really annoying packaging getting in the way of sustainability. (And here is a list of 12 great examples, just in case you needed a refresher.) To combat the problem, we're rounding up a list of our favorite smart packaging resources: 

1. Consumer Goods Forum

In November 2011, the Consumer Goods Forum (CGF) released its, “Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability (GPPS).” The 74-page guide on packaging sustainability not only aims to help companies reduce their carbon footprint but also serves as a step in the right direction to increase efficiency and effective communication by creating a common language that consists of a framework and a measurement system. (Read our complete review here.)

2. "Cut the Wrap!" White Paper

Cut the Wrap! Packaging Waste and Strategies for Mitigation and Reduction” is one of our most popular white papers, and for good reason.  Packaging waste is an issue that affects almost all businesses, from food and beverage to electronics. Unfortunately most of the materials used in packaging is discarded in ever-growing landfills or burnt, causing severe pollution. This paper explores the various ways businesses can reduce or even eliminate their packaging waste, make smarter and more sustainable packaging choices, and utilize packaging alternatives.

3. Sustainable Packaging Coalition

The Sustainable Packaging Coalition (SPC) is an industry working group dedicated to a more robust environmental vision for packaging. Through strong member support, an informed and science-based approach, supply chain collaborations and continuous outreach, SPC endeavors to build packaging systems that encourage economic prosperity and a sustainable flow of materials.  The SPC makes available a broad range of publications and resources to further the vision and ever-evolving implementation of sustainable packaging.

4. COMPASS

COMPASS (Comparative Packaging Assessment) is online design software that allows packaging designers and engineers to assess the human and environmental impacts of their package designs using a life cycle approach. COMPASS helps packaging designers make more informed material selections and design decisions by providing quick visual guidance on a common set of environmental indicators.  COMPASS provides consistently modeled data sets for USA, Canada and Europe as well as tailored for materials and processes used for packaging to allow reliable apples-to-apples comparisons of multiple scenarios. In addition, regionalized solid waste modeling provides a waste profile of each scenario to help understand the end-of-life (EoL) implications of packaging designs.

5. “Balance: Efficiency or Sustainability?

This article by Katherine O’Dea is a great article on the current "sustainable packaging" debate. "A couple of weeks ago, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) released a report titled, “Sustainable Packaging, Myth or Reality.” It seems, however, the report doesn’t really debate the myth or reality question, but jumps right to the conclusion that “sustainable packaging is dead” and is being replaced by “efficient packaging.” How fortunate that would be for the “business as usual” crowd if it were true. But, having worked in the sustainability field for 20 years with a good deal of focus on sustainability in packaging for the past five years, I think PwC got it wrong." (Read the whole article here.)

What are some of your favorite sustainable packaging resources? Leave a comment or join the conversation with SSC President Jennifer Woofter on Twitter (@jenniferwoofter).

Best of the Blog - April 2015

Each month, we highlight some of our more popular content on the SSC blog!

In case you missed them, here's a round-up of our most popular blog posts from this past month. These are the articles that received the most attention from our online audience. Check them out! 

  1. 3 Skill Sets Every Sustainability Consultants Should Have
  2. Puma, Adidas, Under Armour - Who Has the Best Sustainability Sustainability
  3. Do Sustainability Consultants Need to Blog?
  4. Sustainability Consulting: One Size Does Not Fit All
  5. 10 Steps to Building a Better Business Case

If you like an article, please consider sharing it online via your favorite social media platform. Helping us grow our audience is the #1 way you can show your support for the work that we do.

What Does It Take to Be Environmentally Sustainable in the Retail Sector?

By: Alexandra Kueller

Last week we introduced the Retail Industry Leaders Association’s (RILA) brand new Retail Sustainability Management Maturity Matrix. The Matrix hopes to be a tool that will be used by sustainability executives, individual companies, and industry-wide. We also noted that while the Matrix is designed with the retail industry in mind, we think that is has a wide applicability beyond just the retail sector.

Today we are focusing on three of the seven sectors that are featured in the Matrix. Hoping to provide a more in-depth look at how RILA hopes to benchmark across the industry in terms of environmental sustainability, we are going to look at what it would take for a company to become a leader in that sector.

Strategy and Commitment

Before a company can begin their sustainability journey, they must first have some sort of sustainability strategy, right? And if that strategy is weak, how strong will a company's goals be? How well will the company show executives that sustainability is necessary? What this section hopes to capture is how well a company is addressing environmental sustainability at a governance level. A leading company in this sector will have a sustainability strategy that is aligned across departments and integrated into corporate strategy, has defined comprehensive and aggressive goals, incorporates executives from all relevant parts of the business, and more.

The Strategy and Commitment sector has five different dimensions:

  • Strategy
  • Materiality/Risk Identification
  • Goals
  • Governance & Executive Engagement
  • Incentives

People and Tools

Sustainability cannot happen without people. Whether the people are stakeholders or employees, sustainability is a collaborative process that needs to have everyone involved from the beginning. While the people involved in your sustainability process is important, so are the tools you use. If you don't have the right set of tools and the right people, your company might be falling short in terms of their sustainability. According to RILA, in order to be leading this sector, a company must demonstrate that they have a dedicated team to creating and investing in sustainable innovations, incorporate feedback from key stakeholders into sustainability strategy, provide a collaborative forum for employees to engage in, and more.

The People and Tools sector has four different dimensions:

  • Stakeholder Engagement
  • Employee Engagement
  • Funding Mechanisms
  • Business Innovation Mechanisms

Visibility

You have your sustainability strategy in place and have assembled a team of employees that have the right set of tools to tackle sustainability, so what's next? Choosing sustainability metrics focused on all material aspects. Using 3rd-party standards in your sustainability reporting. Having sustainability be a focus in marketing campaigns. Partner with other organizations to continue to identify room for improvement. These are just some of the ways RILA says companies can become better sustainability leaders while promoting their sustainability.

The Visibility sector has five different dimensions:

  • Metrics & Measurement
  • Reporting & Communicating
  • Point-of-Purchase Consumer Education
  • Marketing Campaigns
  • Collaborative Involvement

Last fall we attended the annual RILA Sustainability Conference. Read about some of our thoughts on the conference here.